Biohazard Waste

Biohazard waste is considered anything that touches a biological molecule. If it has touched any of these things, you need to properly dispose of it.

This includes, but is not limited to

  • Nucleic acids
  • Proteins
  • Enzymes
  • Tissue culture media/FBS

Red biohazard bags are situated in the Tissue Culture room and in the main lab. These can be used to dispose of biohazard waste, except for biohazard sharps (razor blades, glass, etc). These should be disposed of in the appropriate hard, red plastic bins designated as sharps containters. There is 1 in Tissue Culture (under the centrifuge) and 1 in the main lab (next to the gel running station).

Chemical Waste

We are primarily concerned with the disposal of alcohols and other organic materials (phenol, chloroform, etc). Each of these items has a liquid waste disposal container in the fume hood. The lids must be kept on these at all time. Do not vent these into the atmosphere or into the fume hood!

When these are approximately 3/4 full, please contact Morgan and he will call for disposal.

For plastic or glass items that contact phenol and/or chloroform (like centifuge tubes or phase-lock tubes), please dispose in the blue plastic bin in the fume hood (labeled Hazardous Waste - Phenol plastics) or next to the fume hood. Do not put these in the normal biohazard bin.

Sharps Waste

These should be disposed of in the appropriate hard, red plastic bins designated as sharps containters. There is 1 in Tissue Culture (under the centrifuge) and 1 in the main lab (next to the gel running station).

When these are approximately 3/4 full, please contact Morgan and he will call for disposal.

Glass Waste

Broken or damaged glass needs to be disposed of in the broken glass box (in the main lab). Do not place your hands or any other body part into the broken glass box. You might be tempted to do this to fit extra waste. Don't do it!

When these are approximately 3/4 full, please contact Morgan and he will call for disposal.


As a reminder, The University at Albany Department of Environmental Health and Safety has in-person training every few months for biohazard and general lab safety.

If you have any additional questions or concerns, you can contact EHS, ask Morgan, or look online at the EHS website.